books

Can Ladbroke Hall turn Notting Hill into an art destination?



Michele Lamy and Loïc Le Gaillard at Ladbroke Hall by Tom Jamieson for FT

“We want to use the language of a foundation or a museum; moving away from the idea of being a gallery. I want everybody to feel they can come in and educate themselves about design. We want diversity, not only in the artists that we work with but the people that visit us, whether that’s a local school or someone from fashion, the arts or design. We’ve been very successful as a business and now want to give back. We’re seeding things here – we’re not sure what, but we know something beautiful will grow.”
Loïc Le Gaillard, Financial Times

News just in: Ladbroke Grove is getting a very zhuzhy arts hub for SS23. (more…)



How to publish a book



La Maison Steidl - Hermes book by Koto Bolofo

This brief interview between Scott Shuman and Koto Bolofo is a rather wonderful eye-opener into the world of photo book publishing. Or to be more precise, the rarefied world of Steidl book publishing. I seem to have quite a few Steidl books, including the eleven-volume example that Bolofo refers to here.

It’s his series on Hermès, which came out in 2011, but I remember waiting two years for as the publication date kept moving! (I blogged about it here and here and someone recently emailed asking if I’d be interested in selling it. Answer: no thank you!) (more…)



R.I.P. Ron Galella and the true celebrity age



Jackie Onassis and Ron Galella

A sad farewell to celebrity photographer Ron Galella who died last Saturday at the age of 91.

I’m not a celebrity follower. In the famous-for-15-minutes age of the last 20-odd years I’ve actively avoided celeb content as the barriers to entry lowered and any old nobody could achieve notoriety thanks to reality TV and social media (more…)



In praise of the cultural oral history



oral history

Never met an oral history I didn’t love.

Oral histories are the perfect format book for the time poor. You can open at any page and learn something or entertain yourself in five minutes flat. I first got hooked in the early 90s, starting with Days in the Life* (Jonathon Green’s seminal deep dive into London’s 60s counterculture), swiftly followed by his equally brilliant It: Sex Since the Sixties* (more 60s rompage) and later, Them: Voices from the Immigrant Community in Contemporary Britain*, a fascinating investigation into British immigrant life (Green mentioned recently that he’s planning an update, which is amazing news). (more…)