retail concepts

The DRG Style Index: Goop, Lacoste, Estee Lauder, Fred Perry X Le Kilt and more…



Here’s the latest weekly DRG STYLE INDEX ranking, a round-up of the brands and industry stories currently buzzing on my radar…

I WENT TO THE GOOP STORE AND I LIKED IT
Goop Westbourne Grove London store
I finally ventured into the Goop London pop-up store on Westbourne Grove to see what the fuss was about. I didn’t feel bombarded; I did see lots of stuff I wanted to buy. A set of amethyst-coloured tumblers, French Girl eye oil, lots of ecru-coloured cazhmere. Nothing ground-breaking, just comforting lifestyle porn at its best. Apparently it’s now a permanent fixture. (more…)



Bulk buy and long tail – can Wardrobe NYC work?



Wardrobe NYC capsule wardrobe puffa


Wardrobe NYC
, a new concept for fashion, works by delivering pieces in ‘packs’ rather than individually. So rather than buying a jacket or a top, you’re committed to buying a bulk set of clothes that work together.

Crucially, the design is immaculately considered for the fad-averse gentlewoman (or man) who just wants good clothes. Behind the concept are Australian designer Josh Goot and Louis Vuitton stylist Christine Centenera. (more…)



Buy it now: Drop Out Sports



Drop Out Sports Garbstore

There’s been a lot of chat lately about the return of preppy style, some of it right here on this very site. I thought it was interesting to see that Kent & Curwen showed a few women’s outfits on their AW19 runway last month, I’d like to request some size XS rugbys please!

On which note, menswear retailer Garbstore has just launched a new in-house line of rugby-inspired tops. Called Drop Out Sports, I love that these are all knitted and crafted in England from organic, heavyweight 380-gram cotton jersey for that authentic utilitarian vibe. (more…)



On circularity, beauty and solving the cost of convenience



Axe deodorant is part of the new Loop circularity platform
I think about the cost of convenience a lot. We’re so hung up on things being quick, accessible and easy that we forget that there’s a cost associated with it. For example, two of my bugbears – getting hooked on free media consumption means we’re now slaves to Mark Zuckerberg and his ilk, and the obsession with a cashless society is a burden for older people who can’t keep up with technology and miss the human interaction of bank counters and supermarket checkouts. (Not to mention the simple fact that cashless culture means you spend more.) And then there’s a third – the environmental cost of our disposable culture.

The good news is there’s finally some progress being made in the field of packaging. We still want the convenience that comes with disposable goods but we’re not changing our behaviour fast enough for recycling to make a significant difference. (more…)