denim

Diesel does dayglo




Exciting news just in this week that my blog buddy Sophy Robson is doing the nails for Jeremy Scott at LFW. There is definitely a nail thing going on in London right now, and no event is complete without its nail artists in situ. Last week I was tempted down to the Diesel Flash for Fun launch (its glow in the dark collection that lands next month), not by free jeans and tees but by a free day-glo manicure courtesy of WAH Nails.

Not only were the nail artists sweet and super-creative (no French manicures here) but something about the whole shebang with the little toy-like plastic fans on the tables (to dry the nails) and general hubub made the event far friendlier than your average hifalutin fash bash. Well, that and the fact it was held at the Dalston Superstore.

In the basement you could see the clothes in action, glow-in-the-dark stitched jeans reminding me of Helmut Lang’s 1990s reflective dresses and trousers – *looks off wistfully into the middle distance* – anyone else remember these? But truly, the most fun was had upstairs where you couldn’t move for fash-bloggers – Isabelle O’Carroll, Fred Butler, Jaiden James and Rasharn Rva included. Honestly, the only fash-blogger missing was Miss Sophynails herself!


[Nails pics: WAH Nails]



Levi’s: One for the What Took Them So Long file…



I’ve never understood how Levi’s 501s came in different cuts and fits – surely 501 is the style so shouldn’t have variations went my logic. Well, now Levi’s have decided to do a standard cut worldwide which makes perfect sense. The reason cited, according to Levi Strauss CEO John Anderson is that they believe straight-leg jeans are a global fashion trend and now is the right time to establish the 501 as an obvious choice for global consumers. I say, duh, isn’t that a bit obvious? But never mind, at least they’re doing it now. Let’s hope the fit is the same across mens and womens 501s. Please understand Mr Levi’s that some of us girls want what the boys have – a nice lazy-Sunday loose-but-not-falling-down fit.

UPDATE:
To answer my ‘why are there different fits’ question, D has kindly weighed in with the following:
Okay, so the 501 is the model of the brand. The model was then adapted as trends changed, hence the different varieties of 501 over the years, with slight changes in cut: the 1947, ’55, ’63, ’67 etc. It’s similar to the way that Ford have the Fiesta model and give it facelifts to make it more appealing to changing tastes as time passes. The ’47s are quite slim, the ’55s a wider cut, the ’63s have a higher waist and the cut is somewhere between a ’47 and ’55 and the ’67s are very slim, and have a zip fly.

That told me then.



Is it time for turn-up jeans again?




I must say, I felt terribly pleased with myself a few months ago when I unearthed a barely-worn pair of (ahem) Hobbs biker boots circa 2003 from the forgotten depths of my wardrobe. It made a welcome change from the Converse-and-jeans rut I’d unwittingly got myself into. When you spend your days haring around London from one appointment to another in all sorts of weather you can’t really cut it in 4-inch Chloe heels.

Biker boots feel fantastically practical and protective, yet rebelliously cool at the same time. What I have noticed is I’ve been turning up my (straight-legged Nudie) jeans oh-so-slightly in order to show off the buckle, as without that essential detail I could be wearing any old generic work boot. Which makes me wonder, as the biker girl look takes off – witness all the leather jackets and biker boots in magazines and stores from Gap to Burberry –will we see a return to turn-up jeans? Last time we had the turn-up trend it was all about showing off the selvedge seam on your limited edition, uber-rare Japanese denim jeans, and the time before that it was the eighties-copies-the-fifties look channelling Marlon Brando in The Wild One.

As someone who will always champion the androgynous look over anything overtly sexy, I reckon this one’s a goer. After the boyfriend jeans and the high-waisted flare, let’s welcome back the straight-leg turn-up. Keep the turn-up small to elongate the leg and as with any masculine-inspired look, remember to factor in loose, flowy hair, a generous application of eyeliner and a good swipe of lipgloss.