Nike

Tiffany x Nike? WTF



Tiffany X Nike collab

Tiffany is at it again, teasing us with a new, polarising campaign.

Seeding an upcoming collab with Nike (Nike?!) with a pair of Tiffany colourway AF1s, it seems this is what you get from a 30-year-old executive VP of product and communications marketing to a new-gen customer.

Online chatter in my circles so far suggests it’s a bit of an obvious move for Tiffany and a disappointing one for Nike. Also, what’s with the black and turquoise colour combo; when was that ever good? “To say they look ‘mid’ is an understatement,” said one pundit. Ouch. (General consensus: Dior x Nike did it better.)

‘New Tiffany’ sure knows how to create a buzz. They did it with their ‘Not Your Mother’s’ fly poster campaign in 2021 and with the Basquiat-Beyonce-Jay-Z controversy the same year. I mean, whether we like the product or not, we’re all talking about it and it doesn’t drop til March 7th. I agree the sneaker design feels obvious. But they have accompanied the sneakers with sterling silver accessories – including a whistle, shoehorn, shoe brush and dubrae. (Don’t know what that is? It’s the sneaker tag – and it’s got a cute back story!)

Tiffany x Nike shoe horn

If Tiffany activates the collab in a cool way (and this is LVMH-size budgets we’re talking about), then they might score back some credibility points. We just saw it with the Yayoi Kusama x Louis Vuitton collab. Eye rolls from purists at first, replaced by awe at the scale of retail theatre and immersive digital marketing.

Let’s not forget, Alexandre Arnault is targeting a younger, hype crowd closer to his own demographic, so this sort of collab and campaign speaks to that. At the same time though, the hype beast customer is edging into middle age and may even be tiring of the sneaker-freak lifestyle. Perhaps Arnault and his ilk now need to be looking for the next psychographic to target beyond street wear…

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl / Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGE: Tiffany x Nike collaboration
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Positive fashion: Nike Re-Creation



Nike Re-Creation upcycled patchwork sweats

Two new initiatives on my radar in the repair and re-wear space.

Nike’s Re-Creation project upcycles deadstock and used clothing into new, lovingly crafted pieces where stains and holes are creatively transformed or carefully camouflaged (below). It’s not an entirely unique approach – lots of small start-ups have used this method – but the execution is more in line with my taste. (more…)



Shop the post: the sensible sale edit



Aime Leon Dore aw21

UPDATED: Some pieces are sold out, others have an extra 20% off…

Let’s face it, January is good for only one thing and that is the sales. I’m a very boring strategic sale shopper and use it to zero in on elevated wardrobe staples that will last. For me right now, that’s knitwear, outerwear and work wear.

Quite a few items I’ve featured on recent shopping posts are now on sale as well as perennial DRG favourites, including the Lemaire trench*, Rue de Verneuil totes* and Gabriela Hearst Merion boots*.

On the work wear front, I’ve heard that people are shopping for tailoring again (more…)



Retail reset: is Nike’s House of Innovation the answer?



Vogue Paris Nike by Geordie Wood

While it’s doom and gloom in the world of retail (Selfridges is letting 450 staff go), I can’t help believing that there’s still life in the physical retail model. And now is the perfect time for some fresh thinking.

Nike has just built its new Paris flagship, a ‘House of Innovation’ (below) serving as a temple for its most loyal worshippers. As it moves away from the wholesale model to focus on selling directly to these loyalists from its own stores, its goal is to focus on full price products that die-hards don’t mind paying for. (more…)