youth culture

London Fashion Week AW15: let’s hear it for the girls



Shrimps Hannah Weiland Aw15

In these days of Insta-journalism, a fanciful theme is a gift to the time poor and attention-deficit. It helps tell the story of a collection which is what selling clothes is all about. And our young female designers are particularly adept at it.

On the first day of London Fashion Week AW15, we saw evocative tableaux styled as an art class and a gossipy teen gathering courtesy of Molly Goddard and Le Kilt respectively. Meanwhile, Shrimps gave us beautifully vacant aliens landed on a glittery planet surrounded by stalagmites. (more…)



Don’t miss: 89:14 – A Street Style exhibition



A Street style exhibition

Another date for the diary. This is only on for three days and it starts this Friday.

89:14 – A Street Style Journey is a look at the last 25 years of street style trends, featuring exhibits from fashion and music influencers (including a fair few friends of DRG). Also included are some of the images from Nina Manandhar’s brilliant What We Wore book, plus a live street style ‘map’ to which punters are encouraged to add their own ephemera, photos and stories. Until the days of Tommy Ton and The Sartorialist, ‘street style’ actually meant something completely different. Less high fashion peacocking and more youth culture fashion tribes. (more…)



Quote of the day: Ronojoy Dam



What We Wore Nina Manandhar

“My ma used to give me a box of sterilised safety pins to put through my ear, bless her; this Bengali woman in her late fifties in her sari helping me out with my punk homage.”
Ronojoy Dam, Another Magazine

If you buy one book this year, make it WHAT WE WORE, Nina Manandhar’s brilliant visual compilation of youth culture through the years with first class first-person storytelling throughout.



Quote of the day: Paul Mason on Northern Soul



paulmason_kevcooper

“What we were doing back then, was rewriting the rules of being white and working class. We knew exactly what it meant to dance to black music in the era of the National Front and the racist standup comedian. Ours was a rebellion against pub culture, shit music and leery sexist nightclubs. Our weapon was obscure vinyl, made by black kids nobody had ever heard of.”
Paul Mason’s recollections of the Northern Soul scene are a must-read on Vice.com