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Buy it now: Estee Lauder Bronze Goddess Shimmering Nudes

Estee Lauder bronze goddess

How to look like you’ve just come back from a week in the Balaerics in under ten seconds. Open Estee Lauder Limited-Edition Bronze Goddess Shimmering Nudes Allover Illuminator (£33). Twist up stick. Stroke on tops of cheekbones and bridge of nose. blend with a finger. Voila!

This stick comes in one deep peachy-pink shade with just the right amount of golden highlights. It’s less pink than my holy grail Tory Burch Lip & Cheek Tint, and less matte than Chanel’s new Les Beiges Healthy Glow Sheer Colour Stick (blog post coming soon). I guess it’s the Estee Lauder version of a Nars The Multiple stick, but with more of a sun-blushed finish. You can also use it on decollete and shoulders (do people do this?). It really does remind me of that moment when you come back from the beach, all sleepy but nicely sun-kissed.

Also in this Limited Edition Bronze Goddess Shimmering Nudes Collection, is the Limited-Edition Bronze Goddess lluminating Powder Gelée (£32) – a non-powdery powder that gives a lovely ‘uplighting’ effect. It’s designed to be used as a highlighter but I like it as a light, all-over illuminating veil. Either way, it’s very subtle and easy to use. I do find the packaging terribly 70s though…

Estee Lauder Bronze Goddess illuminating Powder Gelee and Bronze Goddess Allover Illuminator stick

Then, there’s the Bronze Goddess Shimmering Body Oil Spray (£29). This is scented with Estee Lauder’s Bronze Goddess Eau Fraiche Skinscent; it’s clean, floral and suitably summery with the perfect ratio of floral and fruity notes with a hint of vanilla and coconut.

I adore this; it’s just the kind of happy but sophisticated scent you’d expect from Estee Lauder, with added skin-conditioning properties. Scent aside, this is a very similar product to the Tom Ford Shimmering Body Oil, right down to the identical shaped bottle and placing of the type on the bottle. Who am I to say if it’s exactly the same formula inside? Tom Ford Beauty is produced by Estee Lauder though so it wouldn’t be surprising. This is a smaller and thus less expensive bottle and the fragrance is just as good as Tom’s so it’s a great pre-holiday buy. (That’s if you can track it down – I’ve had to link to the U.S Estee Lauder site because it seems to be sold out in the UK.)

Estee Lauder Limited Edition Bronze Goddess Shimmering Nudes Collection

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WORDS AND IMAGES: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla

Crème de la Mer Intensive Revitalising Mask – a hangover cure for your face

Creme-De-La-Mer-Intensive-Revitalising-Mask

Autumn skin is a bitch isn’t it?

The combo of weird weather, cranked-up central heating, comfort eating, over-drinking and under-exercising all add up to – in my case – bumpy, greige and generally knackered-looking skin. (more…)

Perfect pairing: Nuxe + Agnes B

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Jane at The Beauty Plus (new blog! Do visit!) recently raved about the merits of a boxy tee. I wholeheartedly concur. My boxy tee of choice is from Agnes B, I have been buying these for a least 15 years and as far as I know, the design hasn’t changed. (more…)

How to use a Clarisonic

Clarisonic-Plus

Last week I had my first hands-on demo of the infamous Clarisonic to launch its new counter in House Of Fraser on Oxford Street. Alas, 15 minutes before my appointment, I found the store temporarily closed due to a power failure, so the expected chi-chi demonstration became a potted history with Daniel Sandler on the pavement until the doors reopened and we set to.

Make-up artist Daniel Sandler discovered the Clarisonic on a trip to the States a few years ago and helped to spread the word on his return to the UK. The Clarisonic then became something of a cult, nay a phenomenon, which has now spawned quite a few imitations. But they’re not exactly the same. Clarisonic’s famous oscillating technology has been patented, meaning none of the copies are an exact match. Whereas the competitors tend to have rotating brushes, these have brushes that gently vibrate back and forth to break down oil and dirt. This means that if used properly, it shouldn’t stimulate acne or aggravate sensitive skin. According to my demonstrator, while you may experience a breakout the first time, this is just the result of deep pore cleaning, much like a post-facial breakout, but subsequent cleanses should be fine.

Here’s what else I learnt:

*You don’t need to scrub or apply pressure, just gently move the brush in circular motions guided by the timer. There are also special brush heads for delicate or sensitive skin.

*You do need to clean and dry the brush head each time you use it. You can use it in the shower but don’t store it in there wet attracting mould (ew).

*Don’t use an oil or cream cleanser. If you wear a lot of heavy makeup, Daniel recommends double cleansing, so use your rich oil or cream cleanser to remove makeup first, then use a water-based cleanser with the Clarisonic.

*Men love the Clarisonic too. It has a brush attachment that lifts the beard to prepare for a closer shave and guys with ultra short hair can even use it on their heads.

*You can also use the Clarisonic Plus on the body, even dry for circulation-boosting dry body brushing. And it’s apparently very effective in reducing those icky upper arm bumps (otherwise known as keratosis pilaris).

At £125-£179, the Clarisonic clearly isn’t cheap. But it’s a tool that dermatologists (its original customers) and make-up artists swear by for prepping the skin to help absorb products more efficiently.  Effectively, I guess that also means your expensive creams,  serums and make-up will perform better so you’ll need to use less. In that sense,  it’s really not a bad investment.