Beam me up: how to fake an autumn glow

1 illuminating beauty Decleor intense glow awakening cream By Terry Light Expert Click Brush Charlotte Tilbury Mini Miracle Eye Wand

Goodbye summer, hello autumn, with your not-very-appealing promise of cloud-heavy days and luminosity-free skin. I feel a bit cheated that August was such a damp squib; I’ve not felt nearly enough grass between my toes, or rays on my face. But the good news is that there are a number of new products on standby that can fake some semblance of a post-summer glow. Read on for the lowdown…

Decleor intense glow awakening cream
This year’s big skincare trend seems to be all about remedying tired-all-the-time skin; aka the biggest beauty concern that emerged in Decleor‘s survey of 19,000 women. Blame our 24/7 lifestyles – computer radicals, work stress and overall exhaustion caused by burning the candle at both ends included – for the the dip in skin hydration that apparently happens around lunchtime. Decleor’s excellent Intense Glow Awakening Cream (above) aims to combat those stresses with jasmine absolute, the most concentrated (ergo most expensive) form of jasmine which is known for its restorative, antioxidant properties. The essential oil component ‘drip feeds’ into the skin over the course of the day, meaning that skin should stay rested-looking and aglow right up until night-time. Another claim: it’s good for all skin types including sensitive, oily and rosacea sufferers, and all ages from 16-65. Impressive claims but does it work? I’ve been using it daily since early July (along with the Aromessence Neroli Hydrating Oil Serum) and I love it. The texture of the cream is beautiful – non greasy, light and a little goes a long way. And yes, it does seem to keep the 4pm fatigue-face at bay. Buy it HERE.


Charlotte Tilbury Mini Miracle Eye Wand
Charlotte Tilbury’s Mini Miracle Eye Wand (above) is one of those nifty duo products that saves time and space and can’t help garnering descriptions like ‘hero product’. “The whole world is tired – even my baby son has baggy eyes!” wailed Tilbury at her press demo. The dual-purpose clicky brush ‘pen’ has an eye cream on one end and a tinted light reflector on the other. Containing super-hydrating hyaluronic acid, the cream is for lifting, plumping and de-puffing tired eyes, while the light reflector comes in four shades to illumnate and conceal. I haven’t tried this properly as I don’t have my shade, but I love the concept. Buy it HERE.

By Terry Light Expert Click Brush
Another feat of design wizardry, By Terry’s Light Expert Click Brush (above and below) works on so many levels. It’s the updated version of the famous Light-Expert Perfecting Foundation Brush, but so different is it, that we’re implored to see it as a whole new product. First, the brush is a round, short-bristled kabuki, not a flat brush as its predecessor. The reason for that is the second brilliant thing; you click the base once and out pumps four precise dots of foundation. Dot them on each cheek, nose, forehead and chin, then blend in circular movements with the brush. The result is perfect, natural coverage with an illuminating finish. Easy (if slightly bulky) to transport, you can also use this for post-work touch-ups; it goes on top of faded makeup without cakey buildup. There is one other terrific thing about this – it dismantles. So you can take it apart to clean the brush head and check how much product is left. Buy it HERE.
By Terry Light Expert Click Brush


How to fake an autumn glow using Chanel Poudre Universelle In Beige Lumiere
Arriving on September 18th is a new limited edition radiance-boosting shade of Chanel’s ultra-fine loose powder that evens complexion. I have been using this a lot, with a big fat Chanel brush. You only need a bit, and it’s a little messy but great for setting makeup without killing it dead.


WORDS AND IMAGES: Navaz Batliwalla/Disneyrollergirl

Try it now: post-summer beauty


How good was the beauty look in my last editorial shoot? Make-up artist Jessica Mejia nailed the post-summer contemplative mood perfectly with highlit cheekbones, sepia lids and well, that’s pretty much it. She kindly wrote down her how-to (below) and while the ingredients list isn’t lengthy, it’s all down to technique. (more…)

Chanel’s trade secrets and new releases



If you’re a fan of Chanel’s Vitalumiere foundations, last week saw some new updates. First, its Vitalumiere Fluid (top left), a very pleasant satin-finish liquid foundation, is now available in Beige 70 and Beige 80. I really like this foundation, it gives just enough coverage for my verging-on-dry skin and it’s good to see the range of shades expanding.

Next, just in time for the winter blahs is the new Chanel Vitalumiere Compact Douceur (top right), a light yet creamy powder base that adds luminosity to greige-looking skin. (more…)

How to use a Clarisonic


Last week I had my first hands-on demo of the infamous Clarisonic to launch its new counter in House Of Fraser on Oxford Street. Alas, 15 minutes before my appointment, I found the store temporarily closed due to a power failure, so the expected chi-chi demonstration became a potted history with Daniel Sandler on the pavement until the doors reopened and we set to.

Make-up artist Daniel Sandler discovered the Clarisonic on a trip to the States a few years ago and helped to spread the word on his return to the UK. The Clarisonic then became something of a cult, nay a phenomenon, which has now spawned quite a few imitations. But they’re not exactly the same. Clarisonic’s famous oscillating technology has been patented, meaning none of the copies are an exact match. Whereas the competitors tend to have rotating brushes, these have brushes that gently vibrate back and forth to break down oil and dirt. This means that if used properly, it shouldn’t stimulate acne or aggravate sensitive skin. According to my demonstrator, while you may experience a breakout the first time, this is just the result of deep pore cleaning, much like a post-facial breakout, but subsequent cleanses should be fine.

Here’s what else I learnt:

*You don’t need to scrub or apply pressure, just gently move the brush in circular motions guided by the timer. There are also special brush heads for delicate or sensitive skin.

*You do need to clean and dry the brush head each time you use it. You can use it in the shower but don’t store it in there wet attracting mould (ew).

*Don’t use an oil or cream cleanser. If you wear a lot of heavy makeup, Daniel recommends double cleansing, so use your rich oil or cream cleanser to remove makeup first, then use a water-based cleanser with the Clarisonic.

*Men love the Clarisonic too. It has a brush attachment that lifts the beard to prepare for a closer shave and guys with ultra short hair can even use it on their heads.

*You can also use the Clarisonic Plus on the body, even dry for circulation-boosting dry body brushing. And it’s apparently very effective in reducing those icky upper arm bumps (otherwise known as keratosis pilaris).

At £125-£179, the Clarisonic clearly isn’t cheap. But it’s a tool that dermatologists (its original customers) and make-up artists swear by for prepping the skin to help absorb products more efficiently.  Effectively, I guess that also means your expensive creams,  serums and make-up will perform better so you’ll need to use less. In that sense,  it’s really not a bad investment.