blogging

Happy blog birthday to me!

So guess what? Today is the fifth (fifth!) anniversary of this here blog. Crazy, right? Five years ago, there was no Twitter (well actually there was, but only just), no Tumblr and no PRs schmoozing bloggers with products, trips and front row show tickets. Just a bunch of fashion enthusiasts geeking out to each other and getting to grips with technology. Oh how I laugh when I remember uploading 5mb pictures and wondering why it took so loooong.

The last year has been super busy with a new blog design, going public (remember when this blog used to be anonymous?), some great special projects, lots more freelance writing commissions and some fab press coverage. I’ve joined TumblrPinterest and Google Plus. But this year I intend to spend more time on the hands-on creative stuff and less time on Twitter the computer. It might mean I don’t have time to go to as many press launches or answer every email I get but I think it will make the blog better and me a bit less twitchy-eyed.

Thanks for reading and for the continued support!

[Image: Marilyn Monroe by Lawrence Schiller]

The Financial Times on blogger influence and the commercial clout of online tastemakers

Much food for thought in yesterday’s FT article on the power of online tastemakers to shift product. Do also read the second piece on digital marketing agency Joyn* and French company Linkfluence which digs deeper into data analysis ( fyi ‘data’ is going to be one of the big watchwords for 2012).

[*Full disclosure: Disneyrollergirl is listed in the Joyn report and featured on their site]

On advertising as editorial and Burberry’s SS12 campaign

This time last year I was in the thick of researching an article for H&M magazine on the increasingly mainstream appeal of fashion advertising. I spent hours refreshing The Fashion Spot forums hungry for news of the emerging SS12 ad campaigns to ensure my summer 2011 feature was up to date. (more…)

Peroni Collaborazioni: making the magic happen

Last week I got sent the first gripping ‘episode’ of Peroni Collaborazioni, the fashion project I’m working on with Shaun Samson. Together we’re creating a piece that defines Italian style which will be showcased in November. So what is Italian style? I started off thinking about knitwear (spurred by Shaun’s graduate collection that melded knits, plaids and denim so expertly together) which took me back to the golden age of Benetton’s rainbow coloured vision and Missoni’s iconic zig zags. Then I got hooked on the idea of the eccentrics: Schiaparelli, Anna Piaggi, Moschino, because I love wit and humour in fashion. Then the classic luxe heritage of Italian style as personified by Armani, Gucci and Fendi’s fabulous furs took hold. But in the end, after much debate, we arrived at a different place.

Shaun’s work so far has been very much about textile innovation; he’s an experimentor who loves to play around and let the magic happen of its own accord. I love the way the modern-day eccentrics like Prada and Marni play with textiles, juxtaposing mad combinations together, demonstrated so beautifully this season in Prada’s pailette-fake-fur-snakeskin-lurex texture-clash. Having access to our super-knowledgable Italian fashion consultant Anna Battista has also been quite the eye opener. In one of our email exchanges, she sent me the following:

“People usually think it’s the designer who is the genius, but in Italy it was often the case that the unassuming textile designer was the real genius behind a fashion collection, especially in the heyday of Italian fashion. Many textile manufacturers in the Prato area (who closed their business after the crisis) were actually as skilled and talented as the fashion designers themselves and came up with amazing fabrics. I think in Italy you have fashion designers who are great fabric connoisseurs such as Valentino and Giorgio Armani, but also fashion designers who experimented with fabrics in great ways such as Roberto Capucci or Walter Albini.

“Emilio Pucci who’s more known for his kaleidosopic prints even patented his own fabric called Emilioform, while accessory designers such as Salvatore Ferragamo pushed things further, experimenting with materials as varied as invisible thread, candy wrappings, cork and even gold in his shoes. In more recent years we have seen interesting surface elaborations at Fendi (well they have great knowledge there about leather and fur…) that merged Burri’s burnt paintings with fashion. Gianni Versace also mixed plastic/PVC and silk to obtain lurid effects (that some critics deemed as rather kitsch) and patented the oroton, a sort of metal mesh fabric imitating chain mail that could be draped, dyed or printed.”

Hello, who knew Versace invented that chain mail fabric (that is quite prominent in the forthcoming Versace X H&M collab by the way)? Certainly not me! So we have gone in the direction of labour-intensive fabric experimentation, which is obviously Shaun’s forte. And we have gone for the sensible option of creating a simple piece which will let the fabric do the talking. There are only a few weeks left to complete the project so time is of the essence. For now, let me leave you with this wee write-up of the project in The Guardian