Catherine Baba for Nars

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

Like thousands of other, I love Lisa Eldridge and her excellent how-to ‘beaut-orial’ videos. But here’s something a bit different that I spotted on her Facebook page today. It’s a film for the new NARS Satin Lip Pencils featuring Canadian pop star Sarah Ruba (beauty-wise a cross between Angelina Jolie and Lana Del Rey) and the inimitable Catherine Baba. Quentin Jones directed the vid with Lisa Eldridge wielding the powder brush.

There really does seem to be an effort by brands to feature more diverse examples of style and beauty and it’s great that true originals like Baba are getting featured in beauty campaigns, just because they’re fabulous, not because they ‘look good for their age’ (a ghastly phrase if ever there was one). The video has also caused a bit of buzz due to its interactive technology that allows the viewer to dictate the storytelling. (You can see that version here.) Watch and enjoy Catherine Baba slinking across the screen in kimono-arm-party-gown-fest awesomeness as only she can…

Best buy: iPad mini cases

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

I can’t believe how few iPad mini cases there are out there! I’m in the market for one so have been Googling like crazy. Here are the best I could find:

Smythson croc-print leather case, £215. This dark brown leather case is a luxe unisex buy. It comes with a screen cleaning cloth too – nice touch…

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Are Twitter-checkers causing magazine sales to slide?

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

This is an interesting snippet about why fewer people are buying print magazines. According to Biz Report, the ‘mobile blinder’ effect (people hypnotised by the constant feeds on their cell phones) means customers aren’t picking up magazines at the supermarket checkout anymore. In the US,  newsstand sales of magazines are down by 8%. I’m definitely one,of those people who checks Twitter at any given moment (but I’m trying to break the habit). Are you?

[Image: Miles Aldridge/NYT]

London Fashion Week AW13: Day five highlights

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

London Fashion Week has flown by this season, partly due to the new menswear-free, five-day format, and partly because I’ve become much more focused. I’ve traditionally done as many shows as I can at LFW, but these days a) it’s impossible to see everything and b) it’s unnecessary. There are so many other ways to see collections without the battle of 9am starts and seating politics. Instagrams, Vines, live streaming and the almost-instant images uploaded on sites like Now Fashion and the genius GPS Radar app means you can get a pretty good sense of what’s happening without leaving your screen. Continue reading

LFW trend report AW13: Model mania at Topshop and Burberry

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

Being a catwalk model must be the best fun these days; you simply never know what you’re going to be asked to do. From Mulberry’s dogwalkers, to Matthew Williamson’s close-up Vine videos, to Topshop Unique’s model cams and Burberry’s #Beautybooth, there’s so much interactive fun to be had at the shows. Before I left for yesterday morning’s first show, I caught Topshop’s Google+ video of Cara Delevingne doing a circuit of the Topshop Unique runway with a vídeo cam stashed in her handbag. Continue reading

On Amex, Foursquare and consumer interaction at London Fashion Week

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

Like it or not, the biannual fashion weeks are becoming increasingly consumer-focused. From the sea of bloggers in the Somerset House forecourt (who can watch the shows on the giant screen outside the main tent), to those viewing and shopping via online live stream (pioneered by Burberry), the scope for interaction and calls to action is wider than ever before. The lines are blurring between brands, retailers and publishers, and all are bringing the buzz of LFW directly from the front row to their loyal customers. Continue reading

London Fashion Week AW13: Day one highlights

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

Bam! That’s the sound of London Fashion Week going off with a bang. Well it did for me, because my first show was London College of Fashion’s MA show – its first as part of LFW. The show was edited to the ten strongest collections, of which my favourite was from Na Di, a menswear graduate whose punchy printed tailoring mashed up traditional references with hiphop attitude. Continue reading

Fashion and tech: Frends jewellery headphones

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

It’s only just dawned on me that headphones have become a fashion thing. Recently I’ve been bombarded with press releases about ‘designer’ headphones, why I don’t know as I have zero interest in them. I guess it taps into the wearable technology trend so maybe I should pay more attention. Continue reading

The third industrial revolution: On 3D printing and its impact on the fashon industry

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

Five months ago, BON magazine commissioned me to write about 3D printing and its potential impact on the fashion industry. The best bit was researching it (with some great help from Jen Eleto). I got some incredibly generous insights from the likes of Dutch product designer Sjors Bergmans who made the first wearable 3D printed shoes, Chris Norman, CEO of 3D printing company Kraftwurx, and Peter Hill who runs the fashion digital studio at London College of Fashion. During my interview with Ron Arad, he disappeared to unearth some 3D printed earrings from the back office of his studio. They were made nine years ago – “the first 3D printed consumer accessories”, according to him.

I also spoke to legal expert Kenneth Mullen and commercial strategy consultant Ceci Guicciardi to get their views on how the ease of 3D printing in future will affect copyright laws, while LCF’s Peter Hill even let us use the LCF 3D printers to make some possible designer ‘fakes’ – with interesting results. (Conclusion: it’s early days for this technology but it’s developing fast.) The article has just been published and has had a good response. Some people are calling 3D printing the third industrial revolution, but if you still think 3D printing in fashion means creating 3D textures on a T-shirt, then maybe you need to go to 3D Printshow at The Brewery in Clerkenwell this weekend. (Admission is £19.95 and boooking is advisable. Info here.)

The full article can be found in BON magazine, out now…

UPDATE: You can read an edited version of the article on Business of Fashion

Discoveredd: Curated fashion and style

Posted on by Disneyrollergirl

Do we need any more curation in our lives? It seems the answer is yes, lot’s more. eBay has just launched its new look ‘curated’ interface in the States which will be rolled out internationally over the next three months:

Meanwhile, every other day I’m emailed a press release about a new ‘discovery commerce’-based start-up or an existing site gets a Pinterest-style layer added to it. Well why not? We love discovering new things, especially when there are ‘tastemakers’ involved. I did a bit of tastemaking for Discoveredd last month. The site launched by Oliver Walsh lets you create a profile to add your discoveries to and also has a section called Spotlight where it invites the likes of Caroline Issa, Amanda Harlech, Cozette McCreery (I just discovered she sat for Lucian Freud) and me to share our finds.

Mine are here. It’s actually quite hard to choose your favourite things at any one time (I have hundreds of favourites!) but mine included Bill Bernstein’s photography, J.W Anderson’s shirts,  Dinh Van jewellery, RSVP Berlin, 1STDIBS.com and Agnes B tees.

In fact, the Agnes B tee was a rediscovery. They were my uniform in the 90s and I started wearing them religiously again this summer. Agnes B have carried on selling the same style for years. Here’s me with Corrine Day in my Agnes B tee and a funny hat…

These tees age really well. They shrink slightly so I buy them in a size bigger but even the really old ones are still wearable. But I digress. I think the best thing about sites like Discoveredd is when the curation is ‘meaningful’, i.e, the recommendations are true recommedations that the user wants to share, rather than just streams of ‘I want this’. I find it more useful and meaningful when people recommend beauty/fashion products that they actually use and swear by, or a cafe, book, shop etc that they genuinely love. What’s your view on discovery and curation sites?

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