Photography

Quote of the day: Marc Jacobs



Marc Jacobs quote
“There were places and reasons why street style had integrity and now, it’s about dressing up to take a selfie to put on the internet. It’s about going out so you can stay home and write about it. There’s a disconnect that’s weird.”
Marc Jacobs, ES Magazine

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGE: Marc Jacobs
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Gentlewoman style: Sofia Coppola



The Gentlewoman Sofia Coppola

Oh hi, it’s The Gentlewoman cover we’ve all been waiting for! Sofia Coppola is my style twin. We went through the New Yorker phase together (remember Milk Fed?), the Tokyo phase (Hysteric Glamour, Lost In Translation), and the Paris phase (the Vuitton collab, the Charvet shirts – not that I own either).

Somehow she retains her sense of self despite trying out the different personas and she’s arrived at the classic ‘gentlewoman’ style that consists of anonymous luxury classics without looking plain or boring. Can’t wait to see what’s inside – The issue goes on sale next week.

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGE: Inez & Vinoodh/ The Gentlewoman
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Bill Yates: The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink



Bill Yates The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink

There really is nothing more heart warming than a story of great photography unearthed from the depths of time. Please take a moment to marvel at these examples by Bill Yates, taken forty years ago, then left to languish in boxes until just a few years ago.

Long story short, Yates first picked up a box brownie camera at the age of ten, then after a stint in the Navy went on to do a BA in Art and Photography at the University of South Florida. He stumbled upon the Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink by chance, striking up a conversation with the owner outside, who agreed to let him come by with his camera when the joint was full of kids. He then spent seven months visiting on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, creating a body of some 900 images.

What he captured is an unselfconscious confidence of 70s teens in an era when having a camera in your face 24/7 was so not the norm. They seem unfazed by his presence. I imagine after seven months, he was either just part of the scenery or had worked to gain their trust (or both, a la that other youth documenter, Joseph Szabo).
Bill Yates The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink
Bill Yates The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink
Bill Yates The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink
The styling is wonderful, and you know how I feel about a roller skating scenario. This was the early 70s, a time of relative innocence in sleepy Tampa Bay, Florida, which hadn’t yet succumbed to the commerciality of Disney World. As Yates told the British Journal of Photography, “Now the orange groves have turned into plastic motels and hotels. Back then nobody had cellphones or cameras, there was no cable TV. They were just into themselves and each other.”
Bill Yates The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink
Bill Yates The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink

Read more about The Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink series here and check out the accompanying book here.

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGES: © Bill Yates
NOTE: Some posts use affiliate links and PR samples. Please read my cookies policy here

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CLICK HERE to buy my book The New Garconne: How to be a Modern Gentlewoman



Can Gap’s 90s redux make it relevant to a new generation?



Gap I Am Gap 90s redux

So even though I liked the Gap normcore campaign, it turns out the public didn’t. But that hasn’t stopped Gap trying to channel its normcore heritage one more time to engage a younger generation of customer.

This time it’s youthful 90s normcore which makes much more sense. (more…)