Events

Burberry’s cultural commerce



3 Burberry makers house february 2017
No sooner had yesterday’s Burberry show ended than emails started pinging into my inbox from Matches Fashion and Selfridges. New-in within seconds were the voluminous-sleeved lace blouses, asymmetrical cut-out sweatshirts, Portrait bags and deconstructed cable knits.

Not far from the show venue, in the Regent street flagship store, a similar scenario was underway. DRG’s retail editor Alison Bishop WhatsApp-ed me with a video clip of VIP clients shopping up a storm, swarming around the bags and trench coats. By the time I got home, sizes were already running low on the egg-heeled sock boots.

For the second season, Burberry created a see-now-buy-now ‘immersive experience’ at Burberry Makers House, its specially appointed venue off Charing Cross Road. The collection is inspired by the work and process of British sculptor Henry Moore and on entering the venue (after navigating a path between K-pop celeb Kris Wu and his throng of weeping fans), I was greeted first by walls of framed Henry Moore posters, then by giant spot-lit bronzes (about eight in all). Collaborating with the Henry Moore Foundation meant this wasn’t your average ‘inspired by’ collection, it was The Real Deal.

henry moore burberry makers house
burberry makers house henry moore

As well as showing ‘in season’ (instead of six months early), Burberry now shows its menswear and womenswear together. In fact many pieces are interchangeable. So these translate as oversized coats and shirts, shrunken knits, roomy sweatshirts and artist-style work wear. My favourite pieces were the asymmetrical oversized trench coats and sculptural sweatshirts. The egg-heeled shoes are a runaway hit but a bit too statementy for me. (I much preferred the boys’ side-lacing brogues.)

The bronzed sculptures were certainly impressive and a beautiful contextual element of the show. But post-show is when things got more interesting. Where last season’s Makers House had a host of craftspeople demonstrating their sewing, calligraphy and patchworking skills, this time we got a slightly calmer offer.

Upstairs we found an exhibition of Henry Moore sculptures, working models, maquettes and drawings. Alongside are displays of Christopher Bailey’s process. Fabric swatches, garment experiments, Polaroids and inspiration photography are arranged mood board style as last season, to offer a seamless link to the Moore exhibition.

To square the circle, from today Burberry Makers House will also host a display of the catwalk collection, plus a programme of creative events and workshops (think print making, textile printing, life drawing and a wax resist watercolour class – alas, already fully booked). Not to mention that mainstay of any great exhibition or museum – a pop-up café.

Over 20,000 people visited last season’s Makers House and I’m sure a fair few of those went on to buy a souvenir in the shape of a coat or tee. Because that’s the ultimate aim of course, to use culture to shift merchandise. If you notice Burberry ads suddenly greeting you on umpteen billboards, buses, magazines and online banner ads today, don’t think it’s a coincidence. It’s all part of the creative commerce machine.

“What’s clever about this See Now Buy Now phygital retail execution, is the way Burberry manages to translate the live emotion straight from the runway to the rails.” says Bishop.  “Immediately after the in-store screening, Regent Street was buzzing with VIP guests trying on all the beautiful asymmetric knits and voluminous ruffles for size. It’s a 360 luxury brand retail experience that feels very inclusive.”

So, which piece are you going to buy?

Burberry Feb 2017
burberry makers house february 2017
Henry moore burberry makers house
Henry Moore Burberry Fashion Show
henry moore burberry makers house
Burberry Feb 2017
Henry moore
Burberry Feb 2017
Henry moore burberry makers house
Burberry Feb 2017
Burberry makers house Feb 2017
3 burberry makers house february 2017
Burberry Makers house
Burberry Makers house
Burberry Feb 2017
Burberry Feb 2017
Burberry Feb 2017

Burberry Feb 2017

Burberry Makers House is at 1 Manette Street London W1D 4AT. Open from 12-9pm today and 10am-9pm from 22-27th February 2017. Admission is free. More info here.

NOW CLICK BELOW TO SHOP THE POST…

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGES: Disneyrollergirl; Vogue.com
NOTE: Some posts use affiliate links and PR samples. Please read my cookies policy here

CLICK HERE to get Disneyrollergirl blog posts straight to your inbox once a week
CLICK HERE to buy my book The New Garconne: How to be a Modern Gentlewoman

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save



Looking back at ten years of Disneyrollergirl



2007, the year of the iPhone, Fashionista.com and a new wee blog called Disneyrollergirl. Oh shit where did ten years just go?

Back in February 2007 I was living it up in the world of teen mags, those halcyon days when you had all the time in the world to plan and create and would wait days for your post-shoot contact sheets to arrive by courier. I would research online industry news from a little blog called Fashion Inc (an off shoot of now-defunct Conde Nast business site Portfolio, written by Lauren Goldstein Crowe) and read earnest fashion student musings on SHOWstudio forums (moderated by Penny Martin). (more…)



See this: Robert Rauschenberg at Tate Modern



Robert Rauschenberg Retroactive II Tate Modern

I’m a huge fan of Robert Rauschenberg and I’ve been excited about this retrospective at Tate Modern all year. It doesn’t disappoint. (more…)



Long Read interview: Joe Corré’s ideology on burning his £5 million punk archive



Joe Corre burns his £5 million punk archive of Sex Pistols and Seditionaries memorabilia

Today is the day Joe Corré’s £5 million punk archive goes up in flames. He’s protesting about Punk London, an official celebration of 40 years of punk. I sat down with him a few weeks ago, after the news had just been announced, to get some more background, find out what the archive means to him and let him get a few things off his chest. Let the rant commence…

DISNEYROLLERGIRL: Let’s start with some background. Where were you in 76/77?
Joe Corre: I was born in 1967 so in 77 I was ten. As a kid growing up in south London, I grew up with a lot of children of the Windrush generation, around Balham, Brixton and our flat in Clapham was sort of the centre of all this activity, surrounding punk rock. (more…)