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THE DRG STYLE INDEX: Fila, Sacai X Apple, Mulberry, Mr Hare, Cartier

Here’s the latest weekly DRG STYLE INDEX ranking, a round-up of the brands currently buzzing on my radar…

1. FEELING THE FILA LOVE

Fila X Urban Outfitters
So you liked and loved Gosha’s homage to 80s casuals, yes? And now you want a Fila T-shirt? I don’t blame you, that’s how these things work. My guess is Fila will find itself miraculously anointed with a halo of cool overnight. Here’s the latest Fila drop at Urban Outfitters for starters…


2. SACAI X APPLE WATCH

Sacai Apple Watch
Whether or not you like the device, you’ve got to admit Apple knows how to choose design partners on the Apple Watch. Latest to guest on its Made for Apple Watch programme is Sacai, who re-imagined the watch as a hybrid of identity bracelet mashed up with a croc embossed band.


3. MULBERRY’S MAPLE TOTE

Mulberry Maple bag
While shopping in Westfield (yep, I secretly love a mall), I tried out the Mulberry ‘Maple’ tote bag. This is what I consider ‘proper’ design, it’s a decent size, has adjustable straps and a contrasting-coloured outer pocket that can be detached and used as a clutch. The colourways are sublime, in rich classics of burgundy, royal blue and bottle green. (Buy it here.) It’s good to see Mulberry’s fortunes on the up again, with pre-tax profit of £6.2m for the year ending in March, up from £1.9m in the previous year.

4. MR HARE’S MARKDOWNS
Mr Hare women's shoes on sale
Sale season is properly upon us and Mr Hare is gifting us a load of mark-downs on his women’s shoes. Snap up a high top girls’ sneaker here.


5. CARTIER FOR MILLENNIALS

The Cartier Love bracelet has been embraced by millennials and bloggers
The Cartier Love bracelet has been adopted by celeb-obsessed millennials, even at an entry price of £4,500…

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGES: Urban Outfitters, Apple, Mulberry, Mr Hare, unknown
NOTE: Some posts use affiliate links and PR samples. Please read my cookies policy here.

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What to steal from Louis Vuitton menswear SS17

Louis Vuitton menswear ss17

If you’re concerned about Joe Corre’s threat to burn his entire stash of punk memorabilia, don’t fret so. Kim Jones has a sizable chunk of the archive in his possession, being an avid collector of Sex, Seditionaries Westwood and the rest. Thus his collection for Louis Vuitton menswear SS17 was peppered with a smattering of punkish references, from kinky plastic macs, to stencil-print boilersuits, to my favourite old standby, the razzy mohair sweater. All with a veneer of grown up polish, naturally.

Jones took part of his inspo from South Africa (Vuitton is, of course, rooted in travel, and Jones spent much of his childhood in various parts of Africa) which lent the collection an Afro-punk vibe, thanks to the Jake and Dinos Chapman-illustrated animal prints and generous use of exotic skins.

The irony is that youngsters don’t seem that bothered about starting new youth cults. It’s the old folk who love revisiting the punkish past and they’re the only ones likely to be able to afford these uber-luxe renditions. Oldsters rejoice!

 Louis Vuitton menswear ss17 by Chloe Le Drezen for Dazed
Louis Vuitton menswear ss17 Vogue Runway
Louis Vuitton menswear ss17 by Chloe Le Drezen for Dazed
Louis Vuitton menswear ss17 Vogue Runway

7 Louis Vuitton ss17 by Chloe Le Drezen for Dazed 3

8 Louis Vuitton Vogue Runway 9

9 Louis Vuitton ss17 by Chloe Le Drezen for Dazed 5

9 Louis Vuitton Vogue Runway

10 Louis Vuitton Vogue Runway 16

Louis Vuitton ss17 by Chloe Le Drezen for Dazed

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGES: Vogue Runway; Chloe Le Drezen for Dazed
NOTE: Some posts use affiliate links and PR samples. Please read my cookies policy here.

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Graduate Fashion Week – the New Media Award

Graduate fashion week 2016

While the spotlight of Graduate Fashion Week tends to shine mainly on the design graduates, it’s easy to forget all the other talent waiting to be discovered. The world of fashion media has changed beyond recognition in the last 5-10 years and I was tasked along with Jessica Bumpus (former Vogue.co.uk staffer, now a freelance whizz writing for everyone from the New York Times to Snapchat’s Sweet channel) to judge the Graduate Fashion Week New Media Award a couple of weeks ago.

The pre-judging had been done for us, so our job was to focus on the presentations of the ten finalists. Their final projects ranged from apps to editorial sites to a very ambitious content-meets-ecommerce proposition that aims to let you shop the entire lifestyle of your favourite movies.

Our winner though was Vanessa Cuffy (UCA Epsom), whose site Model Issue is a destination for model-focused insights and editorial (think The Business of Fashion with a model-centric slant). We liked its simplicity and effectiveness and could see it becoming a viable commercial destination for people interested in the fashion model business and all the issues that surround it.

Model Issue
Model Issue website about the modelling industry
Model Issue website about the modelling industry

From talking to the other finalists, who presented some very creative and thoroughly-researched concepts, a couple of things became clear. First, the pitch. It’s essential to get your top line pitch down pat, so find a sentence that sums up your business/brand/app/site and learn it by heart. A name that says what it does on the tin helps. If you can get the what and the why in first, you can always follow with a few more lines that expand on the concept. E.g, “(Name of site) is an online destination that (does what?) for (who?).”

I find that if someone waffles on without going into specifics early on, my interest is lost quite rapidly. So it’s best to keep ideas as simple as possible. Some ideas had so many extra bells and whistles that it became quite hard work keeping up. Obviously, nerves do come into play but that’s another reason to keep things (concepts, presentations) pared back. There’s less to remember so you’re less likely to forget a crucial component.

The second thing is viability. Why does your product (app/zine/ecom site) need to exist? Is it really fulfilling a need or is it a vanity project? It’s a good idea to ask yourself this early on, along with the related (and equally important) question, how will this make money or help my business?

It’s an interesting time to be working in fashion media. It’s a crowded market, there is so much content out there and it’s consumed at speed. And yet, it seems the appetite is insatiable. Which is good news; it means there are definitely opportunities out there to shake things up. I do a little bit of teaching and the students (and graduates) who do well are those who are constantly curious and looking to disrupt the status quo. Now is a great time to do that.

I took a look at some of the photography and styling portfolios on my GFW rounds and I noticed certain trends. For example, Hot & Cool magazine is an overriding influence, visible in the abundance of raw ‘bad’ photography and normcore styling. That’s not a criticism, more an interesting trend that harks back to the early 90s recession and a similar raw aesthetic. It’s like Juergen Teller and Melanie Ward all over again! But now more than ever, an original point of view is valued. So don’t be afraid to push your creativity. Even if you’re still figuring out what you want to say, it pays to be bold and challenge yourself. Get the message out in some shape or form and polish it later if you need to.

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
NOTE: Some posts use affiliate links and PR samples. Please read my cookies policy here.

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Gri Gri perfume for tattooed skin

Gri Gri perfume for tattooed skin

I’m sooo not the tattoo type; I’ve never got the attraction and I’m scared of needles. But there’s something intriguing about this new fragrance brand, created ‘for tattooed skin’.

Gri Gri was launched by perfumer Anais Biguine and takes its creative lead from tattoo history and culture. It’s quite clever because god knows tattoos are a mainstream trend now, yet of course they have a historical significance too. The branding is clean and elegant and very French (it’s a Parisian brand), while the scents sound spiritual and exotic.

So far there are three ‘masculine’ scents. Tara Mantra is a blend of saffron, cardamom and jasmine that’s described as woody and animallic (yes please). Moko Maori sounds more fresh and green with fern and grass notes, while Ukiyo-E sounds suitably Japanese with its combo of green tea, yuzu and cherry blossom.

I discovered the brand on my friend Amanda’s perfume site We Wear Perfume, which is all about fragrance and storytelling (you can find out all sorts of things, such as why Gri Gri’s Anais Biguine wears perfume on her heels). If you’re interested in fragrance and are a little bit nosy (ahem), do check it out. And for info on Gri Gri, head to the brand’s Facebook page.

WORDS: Disneyrollergirl/Navaz Batliwalla
IMAGE: Gri Gri perfume
NOTE: Some posts use affiliate links and PR samples. Please read my cookies policy here.

 

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